10 Houses That Belong in a Utopian Future

I am a big fan of modern houses. I love steel, concrete, exposed beams, and lots of glass as much as the next person, but these 10 houses take “modern” to the next level. These houses look like they were dropped here by UFOs. Maybe there are aliens among us?

1. The Sanzi UFO houses in Taiwan:

Images via Flickr: vicjuan, Flickr: hpj7173

Images via Flickr: vicjuan, Flickr: hpj7173

Designed by Matti Suuronen, these abandoned pod-shaped buildings sit in the Sanzhi District, New Taipei City, Taiwan. The houses were designed in 1978 with the intention of being a vacation retreat for US military members posted in Eastern Asia. The project was abandoned a short two-years later when there were a bunch of several car accident deaths and suicides, which led to loss of funds. The houses were meant to be torn down in 2008, but were saved by petitions. Looks like that wasn’t all too helpful because, as of 2010, the entire place was demolished and is now set to be a big waterpark. Hopefully with less suicides this time.

2. The Kirsch Home in Oak Park, Illinois:

This house holds a special place in my heart because it’s less than a mile from my house in my hometown. Oak Park is surprisingly famous for its architecture for being a tiny suburb of Chicago, the place is littered with Frank Lloyd Wright houses. Those are beautiful yes, but they aren’t weird like this guy. It comes straight out of Star Wars, and doesn’t fit in at all, but it’s still pretty cool. I doubt the block captain is happy about it, though.

3. The Hotel Marques de Riscal in Elciego, Spain:

Images via Flickr: atauri, elfo_tograf, pablomantiguado

Images via Flickr: rocor, atauri, elfo_tograf, pablomantiguado

It’s hard to imagine an architect that could come up with such a creative metallic hotel, but this is unsurprisingly made by Frank Gehry. Gehry is world-renowned for his interesting work and, for a period of time, he transferred that skill to jewelry making and had collections with jewelry giant Tiffany & Co. The hotel rooms don’t look all that exciting, but the building itself is mind blowing. Maybe they give you a silver necklace at checkout (hey, a girl can dream right?)

4. The Spaceship House in Barvikha, Russia:

All images via fubiz.net

All images via fubiz.net

This appropriately named “Spaceship House” was designed by Zaha Hadid for a Russian billionaire. Specifically Vladislav Doronin (not Vladimir Putin). Doronin is an international businessman and real estate mogul, that also founded a Moscow-based Capital Group. Suspicious earnings? Yes. Unbelievably wealthy? Also, yes. He was rated in Forbes as one of “Russia’s Top Real Estate Kings” in 2014. No surprise there. I wonder if he’ll name the place “Sputnik.”

5. The Safe House in Warsaw, Poland:

Images via kwkpromes.pl

Images via kwkpromes.pl

Robert Konieczny of KWK Promes is either a huge The Walking Dead fan or knows something about the coming apocalypse that we don’t. This home, built just outside of Warsaw, is literally one of the safest places on the planet. Entirely made of concrete, this cube-shaped monstrosity can be completely sealed off. Moveable walls and steel shutters allow for the house to open up and let the place look like a real house, but upon lock-down, the everything within the walls is a “safe zone.” I don’t know exactly what the company website means by that, but that’s where I want to be during WWIII.

6. The Steel House in Ransom Canyon, Texas:

Images via robertbruno.com

Images via robertbruno.com

Tucked away in Ransom Canyon, just a bit away from Lubbock, Texas, sits a giant, brown, metal house. Designed by Robert Bruno, this house has been 23 years in the making. He used more than 110 tons of steel to build his dream home, no comment on how much he paid the welders.

7. 2260 Sunset Plaza Drive in Los Angeles, California:

Images via trulia.com

Images via trulia.com

This place is almost like Future Barbie’s Dream Home. I can’t even take this place in looking at the photos but the house has 7 bedrooms, 8 baths, a full home theater, a library, a dance studio, extensive wine storage, a Koi pond, a gym, and a separate guest house. The place was designed by architect Lawrence Grey and is composed almost completely of concrete, steel, and glass. In 2012, the place sold for over $7,000,000. I wonder if Koi were included in the price.

8. Monolithic Dome Homes:

Images via monolithic.com

Images via monolithic.com

The Monolithic Company has a method to its crazy, round madness. The homes are designed to be very sturdy. They are so sturdy, in fact, that they meet the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) requirement for “near-absolute protection,” including from F5 tornados and F5 hurricanes. Naturally, they are great for places like Florida, and all of the ones built survived Hurricane Katrina. The houses are also resistant for earthquakes and fires. You can even DIY one and buy the plans from Monolithic. Now that is some serious dedication to doing it yourself.

9. HimmelHaus in Venice, California:

Coop Himmelblau is an internationally acclaimed Austrian architectural design firm (with the most Austrian name). However, this magnificent home is stateside in Venice, California, which is just a short hop from me. Like many of the above futuristic homes, this building is metal, concrete, and glass and is known for its deconstructed, angular style. This is one of the more UFO-looking houses, it sort of reminds me of the shape of a spaceship right before launch.

10. The Brenton House in Boulder, Colorado:

Images of outside views via strangebuildings.thegrumpyoldlimey.com and interior images via autrecarnetdejimidi.wordpress.com

Images of outside views via strangebuildings.thegrumpyoldlimey.com and interior images via autrecarnetdejimidi.wordpress.com

There are actually quite a few houses designed by Charles A. Haertling in Boulder, many of which have been designated “Landmark Homes.” They are all very different in structure and size, but all very strange looking. The one above is known as the “Mushroom House” and you can tell by the interior pictures that it’s a little dated. It actually appeared in Woody Allen’s 1973 sci-fi film Sleeper. He looked to famed architects Frank Lloyd Wright and Bruce Goff and combined elements of modernism and organic architecture for inspiration on all of his Usonian-style homes. I know it was exciting when weed was legalized in Colorado recently, but apparently mushrooms have been around for a while!

What do you think?