Love Is Everywhere: 13 Natural Locations That Prove Love Exists

“Where there is love, there is life.” – Mahatma Gandhi

Or rather, where there is life, there is love. The world can be a cruel place, but it clearly isn’t heartless. Here is hard evidence that love exists in this world. At least, on this world.

1. Heart Reef:

Flickr: stevemac / Creative Commons

Flickr: stevemac / Creative Commons

This watery heart-shaped coral reef in the Coral Sea, just off Whitsunday Islands off of the coast of Queensland, Australia. Discovered by a pilot in 1975, this natural reef, part of the Hardy Reef, is protected from human interaction and can only be viewed from a helicopter or sea plane. I guess even the earth is in on the joke… sometimes you can only watch love from afar.

2. Trnovačko Lake:

Flickr: nh53 / Creative Commons

Flickr: nh53 / Creative Commons

Trnovačko Lake is way up in northern Montenegro, an area best known for its heart-shaped lake—duh. At an altitude of 1,517 meters, the lake is a hot spot for locals and tourists alike to camp.

3. Nakalele Blowhole:

Flickr: brianlauer / Creative Commons

Flickr: brianlauer / Creative Commons

Nakalele Point is on the northern tip of Maui, Hawaii. Nā-kālele, meaning “The Leaning,” is located just east of Poelua Bay. Famous for its heart-shaped blowhole, the area is notoriously dangerous when the waves crash is. The heart acts as a geyser, spewing water as high as 100 ft. into the air! How far does your love travel?

4. The Joshua Tree Heart:

Flickr: chiropractic / Creative Commons

Flickr: chiropractic / Creative Commons

This area has been a protected US National Park since 1994 and stands an area of 790,636 acres. I had the pleasure of stumbling upon it when me and a friend missed our exit on our way to Vegas and ended up driving through the park to get there. After we were deep into the park and it had gotten very dark, we got out of the car and stared at the stars for a bit before heading to Sin City. This happened years ago and it’s still the most beautiful thing I have ever literally been lost in.

5. St. Paul’s Bay:

Flickr: vincetraveller / Creative Commons

Flickr: vincetraveller / Creative Commons

This heart-shaped watering hole sits on St. Paul’s Bay in Lindos, Greece. Named after the apostle who allegedly stopped there on his way to Rome in 58 AD, the bay has become a hub for ships, fishing boats, and yachts. The clear water drives tourism sky-high, but who can blame vacationers? They get to snorkel and fall in love.

6. The Karnataka Heart-Shaped Hole:

Flickr: dharmasphere / Creative Commons

Flickr: dharmasphere / Creative Commons

This water-filled rock, near the Black Lake on the Thungabhadra River in south India, is in one of the oldest geological regions of the earth. Four billion years ago, the molten pre-Cambrian earth solidified and became granite rock. This heart, along with many other formations, has been slowly moulded by the river ever since. I guess this means that love have existed way before you and I—or anyone else for that matter.

7. Heart Lake:

Flickr: mnemophobe / Creative Commons

Flickr: mnemophobe / Creative Commons

As if Olympic National Park, located in Washington off of the Olympic Peninsula, weren’t awesome enough, a heart-shaped lake is nestled in the mountains and trails of the area. The park even has its own Mount Olympus (take that, Greece!), though I don’t think you’ll find any Greek Gods up here.

8. Tavarua Island:

Flickr: danzden / Creative Commons

Flickr: danzden / Creative Commons

This heart-shaped island in the South Pacific can actually be visited: There’s a whole resort on the island. You just have to grab a boat, hit the water, and motor on over to a beautiful resort built on the heart of the ocean. Once there, you can surf, swim, kayak, snorkel, and fall in love!

9. The Mossy Heart:

Flickr: shadows_and_light / Creative Commons

Flickr: shadows_and_light / Creative Commons

Tesoma is in Pirkanmaa, Finland, situated between Ikuri and Likolammi. The most famous landmarks in the area are Tesomajärvi and Kalkku, but one Flickr user managed to capture something that most would overlook: A mossy, heart-shaped rock!

10. Beavertail Pricklypear Cactus:

Flickr: me2ewe / Creative Commons

Flickr: me2ewe / Creative Commons

Sure, this cactus species isn’t uncommon and can be found all over the southwestern United States. Like love itself, what you see is what you get. You can easily overlook it if you aren’t, well, looking for it. These guys are medium-sized prickly pear cactus and they bud romantic pink flowers. If you’re lucky, you’ll find a Beavertail that buds yellow or white flowers—an incredibly rare variety.

11. Ilha Bela:

Flickr: noite / Creative Commons

Flickr: noite / Creative Commons

This archipelago and city hangs out around São Paulo. The island is only 134 sq. miles. There are no roads to this itty-bitty heart-shaped beach. During the summer, thousands of tourists take ferry boats to access the beautiful city.

11. Mulvey Lake

Flickr: druclimb / Creative Commons

Flickr: druclimb / Creative Commons

This pretty lake can be found in Valhalla Provincial Park in British Columbia, Canada. There are limited methods of access is very popular with climbers—maybe they are the ones that truly understand how hard it is to find love.

12. Rock Steady Heart:

Flickr: penkoad / Creative Commons

Flickr: penkoad / Creative Commons

The Rock Steady Heart can be found in Les Calanches de Pina nature reserve, which is naturally on the World Heritage list, is a giant, porphyritic rock mass. The area hosts a variety of wildlife and vegetation and, though inaccessible, the clear waters and caves draw many visitors. That, and it features the stamp of Mother Nature: A naturally-formed, rock-shaped crevice.

13. “Love Floats” Iceberg:

Flickr: aftab / Creative Commons

Flickr: aftab / Creative Commons

Now, here’s the real symbolism: An ice heart. Sadly, it gives me the gut reminder that love floats aimlessly and, eventually, melts away.

What do you think?